Dating hay budden anvil

Rated 3.87/5 based on 579 customer reviews

then the actual face of the anvil could crack because it got hardened by the quenching...another way of "ruining the temper." I believe the "right way" to fix is is the same way they made it: Heat the entire anvil up to forging temperature, then let it soak for God knows how long, then weld it, then heat-soak it some more, then let it cool super slow (like over a week or two) to normalize/stress relieve it, then heat the face back up to critical, quench it with about 5000 tons of water, then temper it to the hardness you want (if you think tempering a knife is tricky, try an anvil face)...it's not a lunch-hour project for first-timers. getting hard to find and there are far more new and reproduction miniature anvils on the market than there use to be which has dampened interest and hurt this collectible in more ways than just the value. Hundreds of new and reproduction anvils can be found there.

It's bothered me looking at it all these years but I have been too chicken to try to fix it. Miller Syncrowave 350 Millermatic 252/ 30A spoolgun Miller Bobcat 225g w/ 3545 spoolgun Lincoln Power Arc4000 Lincoln 175 Mig Lincoln 135 Mig Everlast 250EX Tig Century ac/dc 230 amp stick Victor O/A Hypertherm 1000 plasma Nick Webb, The crack may be just superficial. If you get good rebound (say, 70-90 %) you still have a decent forge weld between the face and body. Welding an anvil is a very specialized skill and is not for the amateur. I doubt you'll get any rebound back but you just might hose the temper in the tool steel face with your heat.

Some mini antique anvils were given out or sold as souvenirs at the early Expositions that were once a large part of the American scene back in the late 1800's and into the early 1900's.

Examples would be the Columbian Exposition, The San Francisco Expositions, the Chicago Worlds Fair and others.

I think railroad track weighs about 90 pounds a foot.

I also have a piece that's about 10" long and it works pretty well as an anvil.

Leave a Reply