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By: JM Oran A tender smile crosses Kimberly Segovia’s face when she checks her smartphone and notices a text message from her fiancé.She lights up when she speaks about him, praising him for being patient and kind, and stepping in to be a father to her two children from previous relationships.For many years she was too ashamed to talk about her experiences, but, with the help of Break the Silence against Domestic Violence, she is now eager to educate others about teen dating violence, and how to prevent it.A common misconception about teen dating violence is that survivors don’t experience the same level of abuse as adult women.“A lot of the time people think that we’re young, and so it [the domestic violence] can’t be that bad,” she said.However, the shocking truth is that 23 percent of women who experience some form of partner violence in their lifetime report that the violence first occurred when they were between 11 and 17 years of age, according to the 2011 Center for Disease Control nationwide survey.Primary care physicians are ideally positioned to work from a preventive framework and address at-risk behaviors.Strategies for identifying intimate partner violence include asking relevant questions in patient histories, screening during periodic health examinations, and case finding in patients with suggestive signs or symptoms. Physicians should be aware of increased child abuse risk and negative effects on children's health observed in families with intimate partner violence.

The best solution is prevention, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). They often have an explosive temper, are jealous, put their partner down, isolate their date from friends and families, make false accusations, have mood swings, seem possessive or bossy, and will pressure their date to do things against his or her will.

Studies suggest that one in four women is at lifetime risk.

Physicians can use therapeutic relationships with patients to identify intimate partner violence, make brief office interventions, offer continuity of care, and refer them for subspecialty and community-based evaluation, treatment, and advocacy.

Jealous partners might text, call or email constantly or ask for their partner's passwords and look over their date's shoulder to view who is sending messages.

A survey found that more than one of every three middle-school students has been a victim of this type of psychological dating violence.

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