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Basically, a stock option is a contract right to purchase an amount of stock at a set price for a period of time.

For instance, if a stock was worth a share, a stock option may grant an option holder the right to purchase

Basically, a stock option is a contract right to purchase an amount of stock at a set price for a period of time.For instance, if a stock was worth $10 a share, a stock option may grant an option holder the right to purchase $1,000 shares at $10 a share for a period of 5 years.November 2006 As we have been reminded recently, it is important that companies with stock option and other equity based compensation plans implement and adhere to grant procedures.This is a good time to review your option grant procedures and controls.

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Basically, a stock option is a contract right to purchase an amount of stock at a set price for a period of time.

For instance, if a stock was worth $10 a share, a stock option may grant an option holder the right to purchase $1,000 shares at $10 a share for a period of 5 years.

November 2006 As we have been reminded recently, it is important that companies with stock option and other equity based compensation plans implement and adhere to grant procedures.

This is a good time to review your option grant procedures and controls.

,000 shares at a share for a period of 5 years.

November 2006 As we have been reminded recently, it is important that companies with stock option and other equity based compensation plans implement and adhere to grant procedures.

This is a good time to review your option grant procedures and controls.

Other similar practices are being reviewed by government officials as well.

If the stock increased to a share, the holder could exercise the option, pay /share to acquire the stock, then turn around and sell it for /share, earning

Other similar practices are being reviewed by government officials as well.

If the stock increased to $11 a share, the holder could exercise the option, pay $10/share to acquire the stock, then turn around and sell it for $11/share, earning $1/share in profit ($1,000 in total).

If the stock dropped below $10/share, the stock would be "under water"; therefore, the option would not be exercised, since the stock price is lower than the cost of exercising the option.

The first involves the actual timing of option grants and the second involves the procedures for pricing stock options.

The Securities and Exchange Commission and the Department of Justice have initiated several investigations into situations where significant option grants were made and priced at times when the stock’s fair market value (and, so, the exercise price of the options) was low relative to the stock’s value at other times during the period during which the grants were made.

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Other similar practices are being reviewed by government officials as well.If the stock increased to $11 a share, the holder could exercise the option, pay $10/share to acquire the stock, then turn around and sell it for $11/share, earning $1/share in profit ($1,000 in total).If the stock dropped below $10/share, the stock would be "under water"; therefore, the option would not be exercised, since the stock price is lower than the cost of exercising the option.The first involves the actual timing of option grants and the second involves the procedures for pricing stock options.The Securities and Exchange Commission and the Department of Justice have initiated several investigations into situations where significant option grants were made and priced at times when the stock’s fair market value (and, so, the exercise price of the options) was low relative to the stock’s value at other times during the period during which the grants were made.

/share in profit (

Other similar practices are being reviewed by government officials as well.

If the stock increased to $11 a share, the holder could exercise the option, pay $10/share to acquire the stock, then turn around and sell it for $11/share, earning $1/share in profit ($1,000 in total).

If the stock dropped below $10/share, the stock would be "under water"; therefore, the option would not be exercised, since the stock price is lower than the cost of exercising the option.

The first involves the actual timing of option grants and the second involves the procedures for pricing stock options.

The Securities and Exchange Commission and the Department of Justice have initiated several investigations into situations where significant option grants were made and priced at times when the stock’s fair market value (and, so, the exercise price of the options) was low relative to the stock’s value at other times during the period during which the grants were made.

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Other similar practices are being reviewed by government officials as well.If the stock increased to $11 a share, the holder could exercise the option, pay $10/share to acquire the stock, then turn around and sell it for $11/share, earning $1/share in profit ($1,000 in total).If the stock dropped below $10/share, the stock would be "under water"; therefore, the option would not be exercised, since the stock price is lower than the cost of exercising the option.The first involves the actual timing of option grants and the second involves the procedures for pricing stock options.The Securities and Exchange Commission and the Department of Justice have initiated several investigations into situations where significant option grants were made and priced at times when the stock’s fair market value (and, so, the exercise price of the options) was low relative to the stock’s value at other times during the period during which the grants were made.

,000 in total).

If the stock dropped below /share, the stock would be "under water"; therefore, the option would not be exercised, since the stock price is lower than the cost of exercising the option.

The first involves the actual timing of option grants and the second involves the procedures for pricing stock options.

The Securities and Exchange Commission and the Department of Justice have initiated several investigations into situations where significant option grants were made and priced at times when the stock’s fair market value (and, so, the exercise price of the options) was low relative to the stock’s value at other times during the period during which the grants were made.

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